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25 Reasons To Get Your Kids Listening To Audiobooks This World Book Day

25 Reasons To Get Your Kids Listening To Audiobooks This World Book Day

February 22, 2022 0 Comments

On the 3rd of March 2022, World Book Day will be celebrating its 25th anniversary, with the message for all children, ‘you are a reader’! To mark this special occasion, we’ve compiled a list of 25 compelling reasons why your children should listen to audiobooks this World Book Day. 

 

1. Audiobooks can increase interest in reading [1]

More than half of children and young people who listen to audiobooks say that it has increased their interest in reading - that’s not a statistic to be sniffed at!

 

2. Audiobooks can increase enjoyment of reading and writing [2]

Does your child dislike English class, or struggle with their creative writing? You may be interested to know that not only do audiobooks increase interest in reading, those who listen to audiobooks are also more likely to say that they actively enjoy reading and writing than non-listeners.

 

3. Audiobooks can improve children’s pronunciation [3]

Audiobooks are an excellent opportunity for kids to hear the correct pronunciation of trickier words. This helps them to use the right pronunciation themselves, enjoy stories with fewer interruptions to the flow of the narrative, and expand their vocabulary with confidence.

 

4. Audiobooks can improve reading comprehension just as well as printed books [4]

It’s a common myth that it’s easier to absorb and understand information that you’ve read compared to information that you’ve heard. While each individual has their own learning preferences, several studies have shown that comprehending information works the same at a cognitive level, whether it is read or heard. 

 

5. Audiobooks can make poetry more accessible [5]

With their ability to convey phrasing, rhythm, accent, pronunciation, mood and tone in a way that the printed word simply cannot, audiobooks bring poetry to life, and help young people to discover just how wonderful it can be.

 

6. Audiobooks can help increase English fluency for non-native speakers [6]

Research shows that audiobooks can help students learning English as a foreign language improve their listening and speaking skills, and increase their motivation to learn. Non-native English speakers may sometimes feel excluded from World Book Day activities; this year, why not remind them ‘you are a reader’ with an audiobook?

 

7. Audiobooks can be more dyslexia-friendly [7]

By removing the need to decode printed words, audiobooks can allow young people with dyslexia to more easily focus on the meaning of the information they are receiving. This can help them increase their reading confidence, motivation to learn, involvement in school activities and academic performance.

 

8. Audiobooks can make it easier for children with attention deficit disorders to concentrate on stories [8]

Many young people with disorders such as ADD or ADHD find that listening to information offers fewer distractions than reading the printed word. And for those who struggle to sit still or like to multitask, audiobooks are the ideal way to enjoy literature without having to stay glued to a page.

 

9. Audiobooks can widen access to literature [9]

By removing the barrier of needing to decode and comprehend a written text, audiobooks make it easier for children to explore a more diverse range of texts and genres, thereby increasing their opportunities to enjoy literature.

 

10. Audiobooks can make reading easier for physically disabled children [10]

Audiobooks are also really helpful for children who may have difficulties holding a book, turning pages or taking notes while reading, for example. Incorporating audiobooks into your World Book Day celebrations is a brilliant way to keep children with physical disabilities included in all the fun and festivities! 

 

11. Audiobooks can give busier children more opportunities to read for pleasure [11]

Do you have a child who is always busy with extra-curricular activities, or a teenager who finds that their studies leave no time for reading? With their ability to combine well with mutli-tasking and make reading feel less demanding, audiobooks make reading for pleasure possible for young people who are always on the go!

 

12. Audiobooks give struggling readers access to higher level texts more appropriate for their age and interests [12]

Young people who have difficulty reading often find that texts at their reading level do not suit their interests, which can foster a lack of motivation to read and a dislike of literature. Without the need to decode printed text, struggling readers who listen to audiobooks can access texts that actually interest and excite them.

 

13. Audiobooks allow children of differing reading abilities to enjoy stories together [13]

Being able to access a wider range of texts also allows struggling readers to share stories with their peers, contributing to better socialisation and an improved sense of wellbeing. Listening to the same stories that their friends are reading, or enjoying audiobooks as a class, are fantastic ways for your kids to celebrate World Book Day.

 

14. Audiobooks give busy families more opportunities to share stories together [14]

Given all the pressures of modern life, it can be hard to set aside time to do fun activities as a family - listening to stories together in the car, at bath-time or just before bed is a brilliant and versatile opportunity for families to spend quality time together.

 

15. Audiobooks help parents who have difficulty reading to share stories with their children [15]

If you’re a parent who struggles to read, or who lacks confidence reading to your children, you still deserve to enjoy story-time. Audiobooks take the stress out of reading and allow you to focus on enjoying literature with your loved ones.

 

16. Audiobooks can make stories a treat rather than a chore [16]

The technological aspect of audiobooks adds to their “cool factor”, which increases their appeal for reluctant readers, particularly for boys. If you’re looking for a way to introduce your child to more stories without making them feel like you’re giving them extra homework, look no further than audiobooks!

 

17. Audiobooks give children more opportunities to hear stories read by people who share their own heritage [17]

Listening to a diverse range of audiobook narrators gives children of minority ethnic backgrounds more opportunities to hear stories read to them by someone with whom they share a heritage. In this way, audiobooks make it possible for more children to have the enriching experience of identifying with a story that is read to them. 

 

18. Audiobooks can make children more interested in learning about people or characters who are different from themselves [18]

Audiobooks are also an excellent tool for exposing children to unfamiliar cultures. In fact, children and young people who listen to audio are more likely than their non-listening peers to recognise the importance of diversity in narrators and characters, and enjoy listening to stories about people from different backgrounds.

 

19. Audiobooks make it easier for children to engage emotionally with stories [19]

Research has shown that audiobooks can elicit higher emotional engagement levels than written and filmic versions of the same stories. Stimulating the brain’s ‘emotional cortex’ is particularly beneficial for teenagers, who are more at risk of feeling isolated and disenfranchised. 

 

20. Audiobooks support children’s emotional intelligence [20]

Experiencing a wide range of emotions when listening to stories helps children to be in touch with their own feelings and recognise those displayed by others. Listeners could find it easier to develop sophisticated emotional skills such as empathy and self-expression, among countless others.

 

21. Audiobooks can help children to understand humour in a story [21]

Humour can be one of the hardest things to “get” in a text, and can often go over children’s heads. However, comedy is more easily conveyed through audiobook narrators, who use timing, emphasis, pause and stress to adapt their delivery so that it is more likely to “land” with the listener. And who doesn’t enjoy a good giggle?

 

22. Audiobooks help children to use their imagination [22]

Over 60% of children and young people agree that they use their imagination more when listening to stories compared to when watching videos. Children have described the enjoyment of drawing what they are listening to, or closing their eyes to imagine how the story feels, looks, sounds, or even tastes. 

 

23. Audiobooks encourage children to identify as good readers [23]

Using audiobooks can increase your child’s self-esteem when it comes to reading! Studies have shown that the vast majority of young people who describe themselves as poor readers come to see themselves as good readers after a period of audiobook usage. 

 

24. Audiobooks can help ease children’s anxiety [24]

Audiobooks can make isolated young people feel more connected with the world around them thanks to their soothing influence. In fact, 1 in 3 children and young people said that audiobooks made them feel better during lockdown. Being read to provides much-needed comfort in these turbulent times, particularly to young minds. 

 

25. You can get audiobooks for free (or cheap)!

As part of this year’s celebrations, World Book Day’s World of Stories has free audiobooks available for all young readers until the 31st of March. To find out more, click here.

Listening Books also have a wide range of fiction and non fiction for children, teenagers and young adults, including our Sound Learning educational titles supporting those in primary education right through to A-Level. If your child has an illness, physical disability, learning disability or mental health condition that impacts on reading or holding a book, they could be eligible for a Listening Books membership, starting at just £20 for a whole year of audiobooks. Free memberships are also available for those who would find membership fees a barrier to signing up. To learn more about membership for your child, click here.



Happy World Book Day and happy listening!



Author: Emily Pye

 


References

[1] Best, E., Clark, C. and Picton, I. (2020). Children, young people and audiobooks before and during lockdown. London: National Literacy Trust.  

[2] Best, E., Clark, C. and Picton, I. (2020). Children, young people and audiobooks before and during lockdown. London: National Literacy Trust.

[3] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[4] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[5] Baskin, B. H., & Harris, K. (1995). Heard Any Good Books Lately? The Case for Audiobooks in the Secondary Classroom. Journal of Reading, 38(5), 372–376.

[6] Kartal, Galip. (2017). The Effects of Audiobooks on EFL Students’ Listening Comprehension. The Reading Matrix, 17, 112-123. 

[7] Milani, A., Lorusso, M. L., & Molteni, M. (2010). The effects of audiobooks on the psychosocial adjustment of pre-adolescents and adolescents with dyslexia. Dyslexia, 16(1), 87–97.

[8] Baskin, B. H., & Harris, K. (1995). Heard Any Good Books Lately? The Case for Audiobooks in the Secondary Classroom. Journal of Reading, 38(5), 372–376.

[9] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[10] Baskin, B. H., & Harris, K. (1995). Heard Any Good Books Lately? The Case for Audiobooks in the Secondary Classroom. Journal of Reading, 38(5), 372–376.

[11] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[12] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[13] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[14] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[15] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[16] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[17] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[18] Best, E. and Clark, C. (2021). The role of audiobooks in engaging reluctant readers and underrepresented children and young people. London: National Literacy Trust. 

[19] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[20] Best, E. (2020) Audiobooks and Literacy. London: National Literacy Trust.

[21] Baskin, B. H., & Harris, K. (1995). Heard Any Good Books Lately? The Case for Audiobooks in the Secondary Classroom. Journal of Reading, 38(5), 372–376.

[22] Best, E. and Clark, C. (2021). The role of audiobooks in engaging reluctant readers and underrepresented children and young people. London: National Literacy Trust. 

[23] Whittingham, Jeff & Huffman, S. & Christensen, R. & McAllister, T. (2013). Use of audiobooks in a school library and positive effects of struggling readers' participation in a library-sponsored audiobook club. School Library Media Research, 16. 

[24] Best, E., Clark, C. and Picton, I. (2020). Children, young people and audiobooks before and during lockdown. London: National Literacy Trust. 

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